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encyclopedia with amazing injuries kind you really should read it. the city of this that i am on my shelf. this is truly the first hardcover book i ever bought. it's as much love as i can show anything. there is knowing in without dave barry. pat quinn of -- no one made fun of kraft earlier. with that said, without further ado. [applause] >> thank you so much. the onion would never write him back. folks cannot my name is will tracy. this is our new book. 183rd imperial addition. encyclopedia of all the world's knowledge, anything in the world that exists is in this book. anything that is not in the book does not come in fact, exist. so dave's new book is not in this book so it does not, in fact, exist. >> dave barry is not in the buck. dave barry is a figment of our collective imagination. we will come into existence of the power of the mind theater to read this book is, as i said, an encyclopedia. for those are not familiar with the most powerful organization in the world founded in 1756. oppression farmer heard traded sector hands for printing press and founded the mercantile line in na
information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles to work, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> booktv is on facebook. like us to interact with booktv guests and viewers. watch videos and get up-to-date information on events. facebook.com/booktv. >> rachel cox, who was robbie cox? >> robbie cox is my deceased uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he we
[applause] >> i am pleased to announce the city of albany have the honor of hosting the time warner cable c-span local content vehicle cities for. this program travels the country to capital cities, teaching the history of literary life of these communities. albany was chosen because we are a city of rich history and an interesting local literary community. .. >> find the best writers that we can and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world to a particular place, and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that that have such a rer flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. so we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the, to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or maybe 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany t
the security forces in the city, and under operation clean up to, quote, clean up the city, and what that means, really is it means whatever the security forces would like it to mean. in the two-year period it's in effect, some 3,000 men are murdered, and in what we call police encounters, which is, you know, a flagrant abuse of language because encounter is what happens when you run into a friend on the road or a book you thought you lost. these are murders. her, herself, and the government not only condone, celebrate, but allow the murders to take place. when my father is killedded, he is one of thousands. the police now have set up squads. they have assassination squads, torture squads. the city is on fire. he's coming home at night from a public meeting he's addressed on the outskirts of the city, and as he reaches cliffton road, the cars, there's 70-100 policemen on the road that night. some of them are in positions in the trees. the street lights have all been turned off. the road we livedded on, some of you who know the city, is one of those difficult neighborhoods with a british high co
producers traveled the area as we explore the livery seen in new york's capital city and surrounding towns. .. >> and programs with young writers and a summer institute that we in saratoga. >> my life in the last few years was, i suppose you'd call it adventurous. but this thing ruined everything. [laughter] >> we go far and wide, find the best writers that we can ask and bring them to albany. it's like bringing the world the a particular place. and i don't think -- i can't think of any other organization, even some of the better known ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public. with our open door policy. we bring the literary world to albany. so all these people whose names, faces and dates, events you see are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we've had somewhere, my most recent count now has gotten us up to at least 10 or probably 11 nobel laureates across the years ranging from toni morrison who actually used to teach at albany to most recently a south african writer, and
anymore that we thought it had. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicles tour go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now on booktv robert sullivan presents a history of the american revolution with a focus on the middle colony, new york, new jersey and portions of pennsylvania. it also recalls the importance of the region during the war and visit several sites to document their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don
urban plight of the american city by giving the banks to lend and that integrate them into the financial system. very small at the stage. the kennedy reinvestment act is fairly kosher and terms of the way in which it's making those loans. by the 1990's, there is an explosion of mortgage debt and to black communities, enormous pride that the world is trying to buy secondary mortgages. the treasury proudly says so. and then every shares turned to business. the congressional inquiry and the crisis shows that 10,000 people in florida who were selling mortgages and florida have the conviction. for thousands of those. now, there were cards in the wheel compared to the giant financial institutions or running them. but it was that integration into the financial system which is part of the question you asked about unions. but it is only unions. in a sense, you know, we need to understand a very volatile time. >> we might want to open up to the audience. >> hi. i am with the union. talk about a systematic change. that they do. [inaudible] how would that happen politically? they don't call the pres
, and that is significant because it really does show and it really brings the city as a part of the throat and it really does give some relief is he telling you will see on the atlanta falcons, you see the skyline on the top of the city, that is really nice and atlanta falcons, speaking of the skyline, these guys right here, setting the stage in setting themselves up to a run at the big game towards the end of the season. >>guest: i have to make sure you see the back of this because this is the sure the experience, this is the warm cozy wrapped itself around at the first quarter of the first game and still be wrapped around it at the end of sunday night football. they're so soft, so incredibly comfortable and that is why so many people pick them up to give to their kids come grandkids, for bed so far, you cannot go wrong with this as a gift and if you do have people and of life you know who are fans the different teams come to take advantage of by more and save.it is one of the first items that we offer here, with football fan shop, this goes out each year in and each one is different and unique but
friend of mine was walking on burke avenue in new york city and he passed a blind man who was assigned the good please help me i'm blind. my friend is kind of walked by them and, but then he stopped and he saw this guy only had a couple coins in his hat was so he dropped in a couple of quarters and then he asked the man permission to just change the story a little bit for this guy, which he did and later in the afternoon he came back and pass the guy again and the hut was full of coins of those and he stopped and talked to the guy in a blind man admitted have never had a day quite like this. you have to tell me what she wrote. how did you change my story? and my friend said i just added a couple of words and error please help me i'm blind and it's spring. it just change the whole story for the guy. we all have a story. maybe a couple stories people use to describe those. our families have a story about who we are to them and usually are often they involve a nickname we don't particularly care for. my father used to call me skippy. i have no idea why to this day. do we have many kids he
and to read and encounter her and i suppose love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's for go to c-span.org/localcontent. with a month left in 2012 many publications are putting together a third year end list of notable books. booktv will feature several of these lists focusing on nonfiction elections. these nonfiction titles were included in the new york times 100 notable books of 2012. and barack obama:the story david maraniss, associate editor of the washington post present a history of president barack obama's family. charles murray of the american enterprise institute argues a growing divide between the upper and lower class goes beyond economics differences in coming apart:the state of white america 1960-2010. in victory, the triumphant game revolution, linda hirschman presenting history of the gay-rights movement. david nassau chronicles the life and career of the father of the kennedy political dynasty in the patriarch, remarkable life and turbulent times of joseph kennedy. history professor at duke university examined haiti from i
. >> there's $750 billion of waste in health care annually. bruce brussard recently spoke to the city club of cleveland about health care, insurance, and medicare. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, welcome to the city club of cleveland. i'm president of the city club's burped of directors. i'm delighted to introduce to you the president and effective january 1, ceo, of humana inc, a phenomenonture 100 health care and health insurance provider and administrator serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the recent election, at the center of the policy debate with implications beyond the health care industry impacting the largest fiscal pom aand larger concerns. fortunate to have with us him here to share insights on the industry and the developing policy. prior to joining humana in 2011, he was an executive, and before that, u.s. oncology, large producers and providers of health care products to to major health care institutions. with that background, he brings to the podium today a broad perspective on health care issues facing the country. he holds the undergraduate de
is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to discover -- discover that the cockpit, it's the kind of -- i mean you don't mention it in the book. but now we know that? added that escaped us? did you start out knowing that new jersey to markets see the entire revolution. >> someone reminded me, we lived in oregon for a lot of the 90's to my family. before i went to oregon i used to go have lunch all the time. i remember this now. i was very happy after i wrote the book. a bunch of guys who work toward guides gave me free passes to the top of the empire. and that was great. we spent lunch attack. kind of obvious, but it's a great view. and so -- >> really? >> really. really great deal. i just remember, remember as a kid reading about lincoln and and saying, you know, this was where it all happened. i know, and he was trying to get votes in new jersey. but he kept saying, i kno
of innovation for our city, for our region, and for the country in the world. >> is this the original location, where we are? >> no. we are in university city in west philadelphia. pan originally started in what was then a very small downtown city of philadelphia, and been moved to west philadelphia and will we call university city which we have helped make into a very vibrant arts and culture and economic hub. >> and once again, here is the book. it is the spirit of compromise, governing demands it and campaigning undermines it. this is book tv on c-span2. >> every weekend book tv authors -- offers 48 hours of programming focused on nonfiction authors and books. watch it here on c-span2. >> on your screen is a photograph taken in 1942. buffalo, new york. university of pennsylvania professor, what are we looking at? >> via looking at a woman who committed suicide out of a hotel in buffalo during the year, and a photographer happen to be passing by and took the picture. the picture appeared in life at the time and one widely acclaimed awards for having been able to capture the moment as the per
north as delaware city in newcastle. roads and bridges in various parts of our state have been damaged and will need to be repaired or replaced. meanwhile we continue to work at fema and other agencies to determine the full extent of damage. delaware and its local jurisdictions contribute a large amount of resources and a short period of time to prepare for and respond to the storm and to begin rebuilding and its weight. eliminate damage assessment show more will be required and given already state budget we need help in filling the gaps as much as the gulf coast states needed. madam chair, and i just want to say thanks for the chance to share some of these with you today and let you know about the impacts. in delaware we have a long tradition of helping our neighbors, whether they live down the street are well beyond our borders. for years we've helped other sister state suffered from disasters be they hurricanes, tornadoes, floods or wildfires. today, the shoe is on the other foot. we need to help our neighbors, not just in delaware, but all across the country. just as we've been the
. they combined to mark martin vicksburg but it was clear that the city, the batteries could not be taken without support of army troops. and general halleck who was the army commander of the theater, i like to call him general can't be done, told farragut asked if he could spare some of his 100,000 troops to help a railroad junction, to capture vicksburg. and how it said can't be done. don't have enough troops. and the level of the river was dropping so much, the union naval forces and the army troops were there, only 3000, were all getting sick. so the union forces actually gave up the effort to capture vicksburg in the summer of 1862 because the navy would help them do. which came somewhat as a surprise to note in public because the flotilla at that time, the navy had been doing a lot of things all by itself without any army support. they've captured -- they captured of port royal bay in november 1861. all without any army support at all. but clearly that run of success was going to come to an end. the confederates have now figured out some ways to carry the war to the union forces itself. the
of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly set the stage. i don't need to tell anyone who is in this room about the depth of the problem of human rights abuses in iran. i would just read very briefly from the report that the u.p. report filed for the u.n.gen assembly when it was highlight, quote, pattern of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights act
's capital city albany today at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2 and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span2 -- un c-span3. >> up next beatrix hoffman presented history of the american health-care system. she presents her thoughts on why the united states has been one of the few developed countries to not adopt universal health care. and examines why the issue is so divisive. this is just under an hour. >> hello, everyone. i am gayle davis, provost and vice president of academic student affairs and former faculty member of women's studies of women's history. i am delighted to be here and happy that we are sponsoring this program. thank you to all of you and thank you for the nice introduction. it is really going to be the best of all pleasures to introduce dr. beatrix hoffman to you. she is a leading historian of u.s. health care system. i bet you have been very busy during this political season. with the debate about what is best in health care, what is best in health care insurance, what is best for women's health-care rights, being in the air everywhere we look. as a person
york city is konrad motyka. he's an fbi agent. agent trained to, what is your view and the fbi association's view changes made to the 1986 law? >> guest: as the proposed changes made their way up committee, there is discussion going forward and a lot of acknowledgment and parts of the law that needs to be tweaked with further input to take one person accused into account. these changes that have been proposed represent a very fundamental change in how these types of stored communications are accessed by law enforcement. mr. nojeim is correct and there is a distinction between content that is fresher than 180 days in content older than 180 days. the proposed amendments to several things. one, for content older than 180 days it increases the legal standard by which law enforcement can obtain the actual content, raising it from a standard of reasonableness to a standard of probable cause and having a search warrant be required to obtain the data from which the form of judicial intervention because a search warrant needs to be signed up by a judge. it also creates a presumption of
a weight problem as much a but of them. all the welfare states focused on the inner-city and that is why the problem of poverty is so much worse in the inner-city betrays this is where of these government programs focused their attention. when people become dependent on the state, they become dependent and lose the ability to launch the surprises of enterprise. we are seeing that in europe today and we are increasingly seeing any night stays. i think this is a pivotal moment and i think the u.s. can return to his entrepreneurial inspiration. the mac so are you making a moral argument? detected at all tourism and capitalism in the birth rate, et cetera. >> i think ultimately, economics as a moral foundation. capitalism is not based on dodgy dog competition. they conduct experiments and expand
what it wase like.ple, imagine something like thaticane going through your neighborhood, your city when you're living in a tent. there's something like 74,000th acre or more of land that hashe been the harvest, you know. more problems ahead that have grown as a result of the earth spooking, if you will, with the hurricane. you have more food insecurity. a number of cholera cases have increased with hurricane sandy. we're dealing and people tend to forget we are -- canceling canceling with urgent and difficult situation in haiti. >> where did "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know" come from? >> it is anin wy difcu anthologs edited by a group of women here >> miami of women writers called women writers of haitianf decedent.o wr one of theer intellectual wrote. book "so spoke the uncle" he advocated for haitians to take control of their stories, to tell their stories "barack obama: the stories" of their lives at literature and those women, the groups of women got together and edited this that cover the three sections in. the haiti i know, the hai
'malley with the insistence we were ready -- we were ready and resilient. we all said -- punishment on ocean city. that protected $2 billion worth of property because we spend public money to protect private property. that worked. but now we're in to the recovery phase and this, and the response was great. we had heroic people. we were hit by a hurricane, on the shore and coming up our bay all the way to the inner harbor of the port of baltimore and hit by the blizzard in the western part of our state, which is the appalachians. we needed the national guard to respond. we had state troopers and other emergency responders on snow mobiles going in to take care of the elderly and get them out to safety. we did all of that. so now here we are. and now i'm going to just quick word about the shore. you heard what they said. [inaudible] rich in tradition and pride. hard working in -- [inaudible] hit by diesel fuel hit by what they consider unfair government. cash poor, community spirit, my question, and unemployment rate in that area that is in among the highest in the state, think of boot more baltimor
a good war- fighting weather. i was among the first forces to -- of israeli forces to enter the city of beirut in june 1982. my actual unit was decimated in an ambush and we ended up being attached to all sorts of other units for the duration of the war. later on, i became one of the few israelis to be a veteran of the gulf war. in a period just before the outbreak of the gulf war, i was assigned as a strategic liaison between the army and the u.s. fleet. in the book, i went out that israel had repeatedly requested in 1967, precisely such a liaison with the sixth fleet. the u.s. denied the request. in subsequent years, the united states gave to the request and i was the liaison. it was an interesting job. i went out and partied a lot with american pilots on leave in israel. we had a few maneuvers on the ground, nothing too serious. all of a sudden, it became real. all of a sudden, there was a real war in which the united states and israel had to collaborate strategically. you may recall that the united states provided israel with patriot missiles as an answer -- at least a psychologi
. [inaudible conversations] >> of doctrine and welcome to the city club of cleveland. thank you it shall come the president of city club is. i am delighted to introduce to you today, so when can president effective january 1, ceo of separate ink, and managed health care and insurance provider and administrators serving over 11 million customers in the united states. over the past four years and into the recent election, the issue of health care has been at the center of our nation's great policy debate and implications beyond the health care industry impacting our larger fiscal policy and important social concerns. we are fortunate to have a test today mr. broussard insights on the industry in developing policy. prior to joining humana 2011, mr. broussard, u.s. oncology. large producers and providers of health care products to major health care institutions. that background, mr. brousard brings a broad perspective on health care issues facing our country. mr. broussard holds his undergraduate degree from texas a&m and an mba from the university of houston. were very much looking forward to yo
ones in major cities that have such a regular flow of creative talent coming through and at no cost to the public with our open-door policy. so we bring the little rare -- literary world to albany. all these people's names and places and dates and events is are people who have come from far and wide to read to the general public here. and we had somewhere -- my most recent count is up to ten or probably eleven across the years ranging to tony morris who used to teach al albany to most recently the south african writer. and along the way -- or the caribbean writer derrick, or the irish poet. the names go on, but along the way, we archive all of by video and audio all the people that come through. we left the footprint, they left a footprint, and the institute was founded in 1983, officially became the new york state writers' institute in 1984 and over the years we've had more than a thousand writers through. >> my for was a raved are a vid conservative that actually worked at the convention. and she couldn't gate room, she ended up having to stay with me. and she brought a sign. she
to assist the construction of up to 120,000 new homes and delivering on flood defend schemes in more cities. on top of broadband expansion for our countryside and larger cities, we're funding broadband in 123 smaller -- 12 smaller cities, cambridge, darby, oxford, portsmouth, york, newport, aberdeen, and derry, londonderry. in addition to a third of a billion pounds announced this autumn for british science, we are today announcing 600 million pounds more for the u.k. scientific research infrastructure, and since improving our education system is the best investment in a competitive economy, i am today committing 270 million pounds to fund improvements in further education colleges and one billion pounds to expand good schools and build 100 new free schools and academies. [cheers and applause] mr. speaker, scotland, wales and northern ireland will get their share of additional capital spending put at their disposal as involved in administrations. on top of this five billion pounds of support for business, we are ready to provide guarantees for up to 40 billion pounds more. today i can annou
to be here. as i tell my history students at the city university of new york in the ph.d. program -- thank you. [laughter] as i tell my history students until they want to choke me the past is a foreign country. we can visit, try to learn the customs and the white smith the fragrances, recoil at the foul odors but we are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much in the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy as it is this time around. first there are people you have to talk to. and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of committees, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know they don't know at all. the difficulty is that it is not always easy to establish to construct the path that is so close to us and yet this is what historians have to do. our job i
: this is a huge throw and measure 60 in. by 80 in. as a lugehelmet a landscape of the city and stadium of the team'sthose teams where they play. >>host: a one and ensure you see that your teams receivable the government and remember i wanna take one second because upright beautiful and as a great graphic and story to tell. this is going to be on your skin and i want to deceive the sure but because it is a soft cozy and winter decadent material that everyone will love and wrap themselves around it. i almost feel like we should call it a blanket and not throw because for example if you have kids that are going off to college it is great and perfect sizing for dorm rooms. many times you do not watch football alone it is big enough for many people to underneath it. the features are fantastic and everybody talks about how they wash well and they get softer the colors never believed our fate. ifown one of these throes would love to hear from you during the presentation. this is a perfect gift for everybody on last and we will start to see some of the team's ball out. we the dallas cowboys which is pop
of the southwest and others show that this has blighted development in our towns and cities. the proposal for my colleagues, that we create a long grace. for newly completed buildings, it is a sensible one. and we will introduce it next october. the previous government also plans to increase the small companies tax rates 22%, and we have cut it to 20%. unlike the small and medium-size firms, i want to thank my honorable friend for their help in this area. starting on the first of january and for the next two years. i am therefore going to increase by 10 fold in the annual investment allowance in machinery. instead of 25,000 pounds worth of investment being eligible for 100% relief, 250,000 pounds are not qualified. [cheers] this capital loans will cover cover the total investment undertaken by 99% of all of the business in britain. it is a huge thing to all those who run the business to aspire to grow and expand and create jobs. mr. speaker, i also want britain to have the most competitive tax regime of any major economy in the world. i have already cut the main rates from 20% to 24%, and is exp
of literary life of new york's capital city, albany. today at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. and send at 5 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> you are watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays feature live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events. and every week until it's nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our websites, and you can join in on the conversation on social media sites. >> japanese forces attacked pearl harbor bringing america into world war ii. veterans and their families marked the anniversary of the world war ii memorial in washington, d.c. the ceremony include remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chiefs. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ [background sounds] >> [inaudible] >> their name lived forevermore. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless libations of thanksgiving and praise. today, we remember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against g
it by jet to another city, have it treated at another facility in another city or state, have it flown back and then cut the patient open up again for second operation. why would anyone have that done? they just don't know about the other option. i'm not talking about hospitals. i'm talking about to the top 10 hospitals in the country do this. we have got smart people, good people working in a bad system where the financial incentives lure people to do things that just aren't right. i think if hospitals are accountable for their results the results and the patient satisfaction is scored in the patient outcomes and the complication rate, the volumes in the readmission rates, all the basic metrics in health care performance that doctors are endorsing as valid, they were available to the public, people could choose where to go based on who performs the best like any other free market works and like any other uses to reduce waste in their field. >> host: so the issue of patient choice about where they seek care and what has been out there and certainly the health care literature and discussions
bailed out new york city. it goes back a long time. so to get the resolution authority that failed to separate out this is something that is easy. i don't have a solution. >> we have a question. do you agree with angela merkel insistence on an austerity for greece, spain, italy? >> austerity? yes. there is no way you can do without problem with those various sponsors and sustainably go with the quid pro quo. but to do that to maintain austerity to be bailed out. over the indefinite period. this is where the rubber hits the road. where you need very disciplined policies and willingness to lend on the part of the creditors. they don't trust the borrowers who do not trust but they do for a few months. [inaudible] then a few months later so a little more discipline and a little more money. they said the vote provide the my a plan. but behind all of this side believe there is the enormous sense of commitment probably just in the part of the republic. i almost cannot imagine. and what would happen under this situation in? but with the conviction we've tried hour best but traditionally yo
harry truman easeleddest grandson to hiroshima as the city prepared to mark the bombing of the city in 1945. >> you know, everybody has their own view what happened, and i, i don't, i don't want to argue survival with anyone in japan about the history. i think we're past that. my whole purpose for being here is to listen, to honor the dead, to listen to the living and to see -- to do what i can to see this doesn't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us sunday at 9 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> now, a discussion of how the military and national security might be affected by spending cuts scheduled to take effect the first of the year. part of the so-called fiscal cliff. former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen, was joined by the chairmen of the senate house armed services committee. this is a little less than an hour. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is. peter:rerson -- peterson. i want to give you, first, a review of our foundation and why we are supporting the project you're going to hear about today. starting about 30 years ago a
and whatever decision is taken on the future of shipbuilding the navy will be a major employer in the city, not once the new carriers arrived in a few years time and i am sure my hon. friend will welcome the peninsula, twenty-five billion pound package that could create 1,000 few jobs. >> margaret beckley. >> in june of 2010 the prime minister said despite the deficit reduction plan he would only assure there was, quote, note increase in child politics. the fees stand by that? >> we are doing everything we can to tackle child poverty and it has come down. the point that we specifically did was we increased the element of the child tax credit that goes to the poorest families. >> in the wake of criminal convictions of the staff who repeatedly abused people living at hospital is it not time those who take the fees employee the staff and supervise staff are themselves held to account with a new offense of corporate neglect? >> i listened carefully to the point my right hon. friend makes, there have been some appalling incidents of completely unacceptable levels of care and people in those org
-span's local content vehicle as we look behind the scenes of the literary life of new york's capital city, albany, saturday on booktv and sunday at 5 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> leon panetta reiterated thursday that the serian government would face serious consequences if they used weapons of mass destruction against rebels. that came at a briefing, and the two discussed the impact that automatic spending cuts would have on veterans if no agreement is reached on the so-called fiscal cliff. this is 30 minutes. >> thank you, tommy, and, first, let me thank secretary panetta for the up waiverring support to us here at va, but the men and whim who wear and have worn the uniforms of our nation. our close partnership, this meeting that we had today on their plaf has never been more important than it is today. entering the holiday season, i thank the men and women who spend holidays away from our families deafing the nation, we're all great. for the service and sacrifice. as we discussed little of what we do and what originates here, what we work on originates in dod, and that's w
-821 every time we shows up in carson city itself out. >>guest: this is a certified ministate 63 its and original carson city silver dollar that you are born to receive rights to their parent >>host: this is an historical piece the history and again i never 821 it is a limited quantity with only 30 available to go.we are going to go to ourand 19 our 1878 morganhour 1878 morgan silver dollar 7- over-8 tail feathers coin. >>guest: wednesday ingrate the dyes on as they put the original tells the others and you know that the eagles can have an even number 0 of tail brothers and flyback that have a on number of tail other supply. this was in the year flyn odd number of others to flyfeathers flay.y. bear 80 of colors or seven little interspersed part of the daughters and a reuse them a embroided lip this over if you do not mind. let's go of some top and you can see right it is per-share issue one of theat and rare american morgan silver dollars if you go or is the website they have that and it belittles the paper comes included and it is also silbert so the price $119 is i think is a b
love her. >> for more information on this and other cities on the local content vehicle's tour, go to c-span.org/localcontent. >> now, james gustave speth argues that building a democratic and ec lookically-sustainable economic system will bring about a new wave of prosperity. this program is about an hour, 40. [applause] >> thank you, john, and thank all of you for braving the weather and coming out, and thanks especially to the co-sponsors who joined ips in this and the afl-cio for making in the room available. it's wonderful to see so many people here and so many old friends here. so thank you all very much. i will try to not talk for too long. i have my watch. i didn't have it one time when i was speaking at yale, and i'm delighted to see some of my students from yale here, and i ran over real badly, and i apologized for not having my watch and letting things get out of hand, and students said, that east okay, dean speth, there's a calendar on the wall behind you. [laughter] it's good to be here, also, on the first anniversary of occupy wall street, a momentous event. i want to tell
totally carry this, my sons would carry this. >>guest: my son is a lawyer in new york city he does not check luggage. he was like i want the black. i was like ok. you are not getting it yet. >>host: it is very classy. my son is a huge international traveler, same thing. and they are picky. they want to look nice.if you are shopping for your son or grandson or a son-in-3 they traveled little bit, this is an incredible gift. >>guest: or the husband or men in your life. >>host: for us, you can see how classy this looks. >>guest: the black is pretty. >>host: it is hard to pick. >>guest: i want to open up the browned. this becomes your trunk. -- you could take the drawers out and lay it down like itor regular suitcase. i have boots slippers. you can fit so much,2500 cubic inches of storage capacity. then you zip it up so you never need to pack or unpack when you go anywhere. you get the shoulder strap for the barrel-tote. luggage cuff. it snaps on the handle and even on your if you want to. then you get the hanging toiletry bag we put a carry-on luggage. and you get the luggag
away, the villages and cities, and brought them to the ridgelines and the mountaintops where we had seized the drink of build weapons around at all the to tactical firepower initiative that you ever want to have. and it goes without saying the soldiers did extremely valor things. and one of those missions, one of our soldiers has just been notified he is been -- posthumously. but nfib was a much large human beings on human beings fighting. and it took 12 hours to do this. five companies in contact at once. very, very difficult. but the in state of that was all the political entities, the provincial towns, the governor, the district governor in the area were ecstatic that finally something had been done to this growing insurgent problem that kept coming in to kunar. it was a festering cancer that had metastasize and was destabilizing everything. so that was the first thing to do in the first three months was pushed that bubble back, and then from then on we did a series of operations like that to expand the security bubbles elsewhere. ending with units three and four in april of 2011
. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barriers against people with disabilities we want be part of a worldwide effort that says it's not right, it's not okay, to leave a baby on the side of the road to die simply because that baby has down syndrome. you would think we would want to be part of an effort, a global effort that says it's not all right to keep kids out of school and away from education because they have a physical disability, they use a wheelchair. or an intellectual disability. you would think we would want to be part of an effort like that that says it is
, setting his city on a remarkable path of economic growth and prosperity as well as efficiency. as mayor, he served three terms on the u.s. advisory commission on intergovernmental relations and as president of the national league of cities. it is he have dent as i tell you -- it is evident, as i tell you this, mr. president, that dick lugar always rises to the top of any organization because his colleagues recognize his extraordinary capability and his outstanding leadership. dick's life experiences and characteristic have served the people of indiana and of our country so well. he has been "the" leader in reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons. what better tribute? what better legacy could anyone leave the world than to reduce the inventory of these dangerous weapons? the bipartisan partnership he forged in 1991 to destroy these weapons of mass destruction in the former soviet union has resulted in the deactivation of more than 7,500 nuclear warheads that once were aimed at the united states. as chairman of the agriculture committee, dick lugar has led the way
in infrastructure and roads in the cities and airports. we think that that has to happen sometime in the next ten, 20 years. we have a situation now with the borrowing costs in the construction industry and high unemployment and the time to do this is now. whether or not such a reasonable plan to make it through this political system is another question. i'm hopeful for the stimulus and the larger the deal yet of the larger the package the more revenue there is and the better the opportunity. >> on the long term unemployment i think the good news would be -- this is not a lot of good news in the situation, you know, 40 percent unemployed or anything in the previous. but i think a lot of it is still cyclical meaning if we can see the demand in the jobs will come, they will be able to hire. we should talk about what happens if this goes along that there is a serious deterioration and become structural, then in the short run i think the demand is the right thing to do. i think that can has a list of good suggestions and to jump on with another one, i think we need to keep interest rates low. the fed
national, the destruction of slavery in the united states 1861-1855, james oakes, history professor at city university of new york argues that slavery was the foremost reason for the civil war. walter bender, charles cain, jody corners, and neil donahue who all contributed to creating the company one laptop per child was that a company history and provided an outline for other social of japan yours in learning to change the world, the social impact of one lap top per child. in napoleon, left a legacy, and
ddt on a million civilians in italy and halted a typhus outbreak threatened the city. well, through the 1940s and 1850s and early 1960s, ddt kind of goes everywhere. and as it does, other insect sites chemically similar are developed, so there is a hole every of pesticides coming common use initially in military settings, but then after the war and forestry, agriculture, residential, things used in hospitals, commercial buildings and homes and lots and lots of different products. one of the problems for spraying poison from airplanes as it's really hard to control where it goes and yet this was done extensively. these are all classic. i grew up in florida where there was encephalitis as an epidemic that corrupted because the mosquitoes transmit brain disease. tracks like this have come from a neighborhood of limited my brothers and i would get his teeth into that mark as they possibly could because it was really fun. again, it was everywhere, thought to be harmless to people. although, i should say that carson's entries in ddt was based on evidence that it is not entirely safe. agai
is like we will show you. there is a menu you press show traffic and it scans the whole city showing you live traffic information. so you know the fastest way to get to work in the morning. turn by turn directions. >>host: the cell- phone i have right now is the contract obviously. the that you get by the way. i am spending $200 per month and i cannot get traffic on my phone. a lot of the things you can do with this cannot do with mind that i am spending $200 per month. --mine are the least bit skeptical, you need to wrap your brain around it. no contract or credit checks. you pay as you go. you are never out of money because you only buy what you need.you probably will not need to get airtime for ya year because you get $140 worth. remember,if your purchase is a gift, hsn's return policy is now extended until january 31st, 2013! this applies until december 20, 2012. i would absolutely get it. you get this home and put it under the tree they will lose their minds. for parents of america you want a real smartphone because you get one pretending to be one they will be . get your first c
of history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday on booktv on c-span2. and sunday at 5 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> we've had these explosionexplosion s of knowledge in madison. but we have not coordinated care, and all these services that we have independent so many cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. and you get to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people over all? i mean come on a global level what are we doing sometimes? and, of course, now we've got these reports saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary. step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the test was order, the procedures. this is something i think which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. problem. >> dysfunction and u.s. health care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals won't tell you. his latest is an accountable. >> senate finance committee chair max baucus left capitol hill earlier this week to give his thoughts on what's called the fiscal cliff and negotiations that are currently und
challenging as it may be, holding elections in the major cities and in the northern regions would be this strong guest impossible of mali's sovereignty or territory and steps of rebuilding a democracy. the transition government is government plans and actions to the public and the crisis of legitimacy. the international community needs to harmonize its approach toward the pursuit of the polls that could lead to the legitimately elected government and military actions to detect the north. the contradictory public that take the military option off the table in the short and medium-term may only serve to emboldened the extra hauling them time to reinforce their presence. such also exacerbate fear there may be a conspiracy to breakout and to the civilian space rule out the hand of the pro-democracy forces within the country and for the work that is deeply invested in the space rule. many malians were proud of the country's democracy to consolidating the need by strengthening institutions and enhancing accountability and in the intelligence of the coup it's now been superseded by the c
. all we need is her name address and we could even ship it to another in another city or state it does not cost you anything. $39.99 plus tax today and it gets shipped within 48 hours. anybody who calls after theext two hours i would say in all likelihood will go into extended delivery. they may have to wait a little bit longer to get their kindle- fire.and here is what you get.you get the usb that is how charge it stylus earbudsa $25 gift certificate. aaron berger is esses are electronic expert. he has sold every single tablet (...) >>guest: known to man, womanild >>host: that is not an exaggeration. >>guest: we have got to sell a lot of great tablets but not more popular than this. it probably has been the most popular today's special i have done with 25,000 out the door. and it is 3:00 p.m. in the afternoon. --4:00 p.m.. it is the lowest price we have ever done on the can pole, we have sold the kindle-fire before- a-kid pole. kindle 13 do on any tablet for the rest of thef you want to do email watch a video, download movies applications this is it. this is the one. the top sel
in public as so many school committees and city councils around this country raced to do. and for this white house people seem to view it as an inconvenience and annoyance when you bring enough that they're not offering that level of transparency. so i think it is both the difficulty of wrestling agencies to the ground and some sort of lack of commitment at the top two the ideals of transparency, particularly when there is any political downside. one of your colleagues said in one of my stores a few months ago that as soon as you collide with something that has a political downside transparency goes by the wayside. that is essentially what i think has happened in many instances. the transparency folks can often carry the day when it is something that the mainstream press is not really interested in. the moment it gets into the spotlight, that values seems to slip pretty far down on the scale of what the white house said. >> ask you to follow pieces. one has to do with the administration has made new commitments, for example, they reaffirmed the commitments for the office of regulatory -- eve
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